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I've found an answer to a question that was closed as being off-topic. Since new answers aren't possible I left a comment on that question stating what I'd found. To see the comment though you'd have to click on the 'show all comments' link which means that future readers of that question might erroneously conclude that the question has no solution. What's the best way to handle this situation? Was it inappropriate for me to have provided an answer (as a comment)?

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I've found an answer to a question that was closed as being off-topic. Since new answers aren't possible I left a comment on that question stating what I'd found.

Sounds like a good way if one realy feels the urge to add something. If at all, after all, the question itself is deemed off-topic, thus any answer may be as well.

To see the comment though you'd have to click on the 'show all comments' link which means that future readers of that question might erroneously conclude that the question has no solution.

Most important, since the question is closed, it's also hard to find anyway. THus not much further readers anyway. Also, If someone is realy digging for information, he will for sure read all comments, so he will get it.

What's the best way to handle this situation? Was it inappropriate for me to have provided an answer (as a comment)?

Usually I'd just suggest to ignore it. Using the way of adding a comment does the trick, so you got rid of that information. And no, it wasn't inapropriate, as it's perfectly ok to add later comments.

Bottom line: No need for a change and you did ok.


Ofc, there is always the atempt to reopen it. Only, just because there is an answer doesn't make an off-topic question on-topic in any way. So better let it the way it is..

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  • The question was closed for being off-topic so I don't think it would be appropriate to attempt to reöpen it. To be specific, the question was closed because it involves running retro software under a modern OS. The current answer simply says there probably is no answer. I must say that I'm surprised noöne came across the page I linked to while the question was open. I just stumbled across it whilst looking at something else. ←Most of that was for anyone who themselves stumbles upon this comment :^) Nov 22 '18 at 6:00
  • @AlexHajnal (To be honest, I didn't search at all.) But whats more important: how did you manage to get an ö into this comment of yours? (reöpen) Estonian, German or Icelandic keyboard? :))
    – Raffzahn
    Nov 22 '18 at 14:10
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    I've got caps lock set as a compose key under X11. ö = <compose> o " The config I use covers most of the European languages (ñ, ç, ß, etc.) plus a bunch of useful symbols (µ, , etc.). And, of course, my favorite letter þ Nov 22 '18 at 14:53
  • Ah, I see ... except it doesn't make sense as that's something noone types just by sliping. Hmm, thinking of it, if "is used for umlaut-dots, then how do you produce Hungarian stroke umlauts?
    – Raffzahn
    Nov 22 '18 at 15:45
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    I don't :^) Looking through the config it's apparently done with the equals sign: ő = <compose> = o Nov 22 '18 at 15:56
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    Note that I'm using a dedicated compose key, not deadkeys. My keyboard acts a standard US keyboard except that hitting "caps lock", instead of switching to upper case, combines the keystrokes that follow into a single character. If a sequence isn't recognised then the last character of the sequence is output. There are several thousand sequences built-in and one can add custom sequences in ~/.Xcompose Nov 22 '18 at 16:07
  • @Raffzahn -- it's very much a minority opinion, but there are a group of people who feel that when a word in English combines two vowels together but they're not part of the same syllable, a diaeresis should be used to mark them. It's most common when the same vowel pair would more usually be read as a diphthong (e.g. in "coöperate"), but at least by some style guides reöpen is correct. Although spellcheckers hate it, as noted by this article from the New Yorker, which is the most popular publication that uses it.
    – Jules
    Dec 1 '18 at 5:15
  • @Jules Well, Tremata are something rather unique to Dutch and Greek (where they got their name anyway). In next to all other languages two dots are used to mark a different pronounciation (like in German, Russian or Albanian), while an acent is used to mark seperate pronounciation. I's most definitly new to me that it might be used that way in English. Usually some acccent is used here, isn't it? So, something learned today ... no matter how alien it looks.
    – Raffzahn
    Dec 1 '18 at 6:08
  • @Raffzahn they’re used in French too for that purpose (to split digraphs, as in maïs or aiguë). Apr 24 '19 at 20:30
  • @AlexHajnal No-one is spelled with a hyphen or as two separate words.
    – Leo B.
    Jun 14 '19 at 23:22
  • @Jules Reading it again it's even more funny that an English language magazine tries to use markers for pronunciation .. after all, English isn't exactly known for it's relation between spelling and speaking :))
    – Raffzahn
    Jun 15 '19 at 8:50

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