16

As a moderator on StackOverflow (where we suspend people a lot), I can say that Retrocomputing is really different. On StackOverflow, we often see desperate people trying to make their project work/cheat on their exam/assignment and getting their questions closed/downvoted to oblivion, just because the questions are bad or contain "URGENT" or lack ...


11

As I already said elsewhere, I think we should definitely try to market the site to a broader audience. I suspect a number of people think that this site is just for "experts". (In fact, I originally thought that I'd never be able to answer any questions here because I'm younger than these technologies, and have never used many of them.) It's not just for ...


7

Everyone here is nice. The absolute worst behaviour ever has been minor rudeness and snark; in fact, here's my helpful flag entry for one of the worst incidents I've ever seen: I've edited it to remove some of the more objectionable (slightly condescending) sentences. Those "objectionable" sentences were a couple of "you've completely ...


7

I've been monitoring the stats on Area51 and I have a few thoughts. Our biggest problem is definitely the number of users / traffic levels. I think that is just a function of retro-computing being a niche subject but certainly its something we can actively work on by trying to get the word out more. The other problem is the low answer ratio. A lot of ...


7

To add to the existing answers: I have been involved with a few other beta site creations - although not as deeply involved as this one. It is normal in my experience for there to be a flurry of activity in the first week or two, then to see a dip as things settle. I would expect activity to pick up. As has already been said, it is quality that drives ...


5

The relative calmness (as opposed to "heated discussions") here very probably results from the topic and the crowd interested in that topic: There's rarely a sense of urgency in requiring a proper answer - the computers we work with have been around for 30, 50, even 50 years, there's not much point in pressing for an answer within a day... No one'...


5

I've been trying to share some of the our questions on reddit/twitter where appropriate. I've even managed to get 1000 uniques to Why use static RAM addresses instead of the stack? I think as more questions are asked and shared, we will draw an audience that comes for one question, but stays to ask and answer other questions about retrocomputing.


4

Good time to ask the question, some early effort to raise the profile of the site should help in the longer term. Looking at the stats in more detail, the quality of the site looks good, it is the activity which is a little on the low side. At only half-way through the minimum beta period, we seem to have nearly enough members with around 1k rep (assuming ...


4

Adoption will take time to hit critical mass --- if that happens at all. Realize that retrocomputing is at once both a broadly scoped topic and a niche. Also, SE sites are Q&A rather than social in nature, and retrocomputing is often a social hobby. Suppose, for instance, you're interested in a 1970's era Hypothetical500 system. Odds are you're already ...


1

With the benefit of hindsight, I think I can say that the site has managed more than just fine. Here’s a comparison of Area 51 statistics from around when the question was posted versus those same statistics as of now. Other than the question rate, all the metrics have significantly improved (and the high answer rate was sustained). I would even dispute that ...


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